How to Explain Your Story’s Premise Without Getting Tongue-Tied // an article for the not-so-nimble of speech

I’m dedicating this article to Robin Barnes, who I only met twice in my life and seemed like a lovely person. She did, however, traumatize me as a fifteen year old when she asked what my book was about, and I, standing directly in the middle of my Christian homeschool co-op, panicked and blurted, “A monster eats people!”

I’m sure Robin Barnes is fabulous. I wouldn’t know, because since that day, I spent the next six years aggressively avoiding her.

My ego can only take so many hits, guys.

Mrs. Barnes — thank you for teaching me the value of having a book premise on hand for the circumvention of public humiliation.

//How to Explain Your Story’s Premise Without Getting Tongue-Tied//

Happy reading!

~Sarah

2 thoughts on “How to Explain Your Story’s Premise Without Getting Tongue-Tied // an article for the not-so-nimble of speech

  1. I think my problem is the opposite — in the rare instance someone expresses interest in one of my stories, I can’t seem to shut up! If they let me, I’ll spoil the whole plot for them. XD

    Like

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